Coursework - Seung Jae "Ryan" Lee

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Spring 2017 COS333 - Advanced Programming Techniques
This is a course about the practice of programming. Programming is more than just writing code. Programmers must also assess tradeoffs, choose among design alternatives, debug and test, improve performance, and maintain software written by themselves & others. At the same time, they must be concerned with compatibility, robustness, and reliability, while meeting specifications. Students will have the opportunity to develop these skills by working on their own code and in group projects.

Spring 2017 ORF309 - Probability and Stochastic Systems
An introduction to probability and its applications. Topics include: basic principles of probability; Lifetimes and reliability, Poisson processes; random walks; Brownian motion; branching processes; Markov chains

Spring 2017 MAT375 - Introduction to Graph Theory
The fundamental theorems and algorithms of graph theory. Topics include: connectivity, matchings, graph coloring, planarity, the four-color theorem, extremal problems, network flows, and related algorithms.

Fall 2016 COS217 - Introduction to Programming Systems
Introduction to programming systems, including modular programming, advanced program design, programming style, test, debugging and performance tuning; machine languages and assembly language; and use of system call services.

Spring 2016 COS 226 — Algorithms and Data Structures
This course surveys the most important algorithms and data structures in use on computers today. Particular emphasis is given to algorithms for sorting, searching, and string processing. Fundamental algorithms in a number of other areas are covered as well, including geometric algorithms, graph algorithms, and some numerical algorithms. The course will concentrate on developing implementations, understanding their performance characteristics, and estimating their potential effectiveness in applications.

Fall 2015 COS 126 - General Computer Science
An introduction to computer science in the context of scientific, engineering, and commercial applications. The course will teach basic principles and practical issues, and will prepare students to use computers effectively for applications in computer science, physics, biology, chemistry, engineering, and other disciplines. Topics include: hardware and software systems; programming in Java; algorithms and data structures; fundamental principles of computation; and scientific computing, including simulation, optimization, and data analysis. No prior programming experience required. Video lectures, one or two classes, two precepts